208: Julie Ann Winkelstein

Steve chats with Julie Ann Winkelstein, author of Homelessness and Libraries: an Action Guide, about her path to librarianship, terminology when discussing homelessness, compassion fatigue, and creating an action plan.

Read the transcript!

Julie Ann Winkelstein, MLIS, PhD, is a librarian, writer, activist and teacher. She is the author of Libraries and Homelessness: An Action Guide (Libraries Unlimited), as well as several book chapters and journal articles, and was a contributing author and primary editor of the IFLA “Guidelines for Library Services to People Experiencing Homelessness.” Winkelstein created and teaches a library school master’s level course on homelessness, poverty and public libraries at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and a similar course at the University of Washington.  She has presented internationally on the topic of libraries and homelessness, including LGBTQ+ youth homelessness, and through an IMLS grant provided trainings and workshops for library staff on this topic. She worked for 20 years as a public librarian in a range of roles, from jail and prison librarian to family literacy coordinator to young adult and children’s librarian. Her work focuses on the intersection of social justice and public libraries. 

SPONSOR:

Syndetics Unbound, from ProQuest and LibraryThing.
Syndetics Unbound helps public and academic libraries enrich their catalogs and discovery systems with high-interest elements, including cover images, summaries, author profiles, similar books, reviews, and more. Syndetics Unbound encourages serendipitous discovery and higher collection usage, and was recently awarded Platinum distinction in the LibraryWorks 2021 Modern Library Awards. To learn more about Syndetics Unbound, visit Syndetics.com. While there, be sure to visit their “News” tab to check out the Syndetics Unbound Blog for news and analysis, including a break-down of 2020’s most popular titles in public and academic libraries.

SHOW NOTES:

Libraries and Homelessness: an Action Guide
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207: Hugo Mercier

Guest host Troy Swanson chats with Dr. Hugo Mercier, research scientist and author of Not Born Yesterday: The Science of Who We Trust and What We Believe, about cognitive science, how humans think they make decisions (and how they actually do), intuition, and why we aren’t as easily fooled as we think (…or are we?).

Read the transcript!

Hugo Mercier who holds the PhD in cognitive sciences and is a research scientist at the Institut Jean Nicod, Paris where he works as part of the Evolution and Social Cognition team and the Collective Intelligence team. He is the co-author with Dan Sperber of the book The Enigma of Reason, and, most recently, he is the sole author of the book, Not Born Yesterday: The Science of Who We Trust and What We Believe.

Troy A. Swanson is Teaching & Learning Librarian and Library Department Chair at Moraine Valley Community College. He is also the President of the Moraine Valley Faculty Association. Troy is the author or editor of several books and articles including co-editor of Not Just Where to Click: Teaching Students How to Think About Information which received the Ilene F. Rockman Publication of the Year Award from ARCL’s Instruction Section. His Ph.D. dissertation focused on the management of technology policy in higher education. He served on ACRL’s Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Task Force which issued the Framework for Information Literacy.  Over his tenure as a librarian and educator, Troy has won his campuses Master Teacher and Innovation of the Year awards, as well as the Proquest Innovation in College Librarianship award from ACRL. 

Today’s show is brought to you by Syndetics Unbound, from ProQuest and LibraryThing. Syndetics Unbound helps public and academic libraries enrich their catalogs and discovery systems with high-interest elements, including cover images, summaries, author profiles, similar books, reviews, and more. Syndetics Unbound encourages serendipitous discovery and higher collection usage, and was recently awarded Platinum distinction in the LibraryWorks 2021 Modern Library Awards. To learn more about Syndetics Unbound, visit Syndetics.com. While there, be sure to visit their “News” tab to check out the Syndetics Unbound Blog for news and analysis, including a break-down of 2020’s most popular titles in public and academic libraries.

SHOW NOTES:

Subscribe to the Circulating Ideas newsletter for a deeper dive into this episode’s content!
The Enigma of Reason
Not Born Yesterday: The Science of Who We Trust and What We Believe

199: The Library’s Guide to Graphic Novels

Steve chats with John Ballestro, editor of The Library’s Guide to Graphic Novels, along with many of the contributors, to discuss the ever-changing ways that graphic novels are created, packaged, marketed, and released, exploring such topics as the history of comics, collection development, cataloging, and specialized resources.

Today’s show is brought to you by Syndetics Unbound, from ProQuest and LibraryThing. Syndetics Unbound helps public and academic libraries enrich their catalogs and discovery systems with high-interest elements, including cover images, summaries, author profiles, similar books, reviews, and more. Syndetics Unbound encourages serendipitous discovery and higher collection usage, and was recently awarded Platinum distinction in the LibraryWorks 2021 Modern Library Awards. To learn more about Syndetics Unbound, visit Syndetics.com. While there, be sure to visit their “News” tab to check out the Syndetics Unbound Blog for news and analysis, including a break-down of 2020’s most popular titles in public and academic libraries.

SHOW NOTES:

The Library’s Guide to Graphic Novels
ALCTS
Fantagraphics
“The Differences Between Manga, Manhwa & Manhua, Explained” [CBR.com]
Graphic Medicine
The Comic Book Collection (Library of Congress)
Cataloging Graphic Novels (Library of Congress)
LCSH 1430
DC Archive Editions

Recommendations:

Digger by Ursula Vernon
Graphic Medicine – Penn State Press
Graphic History Series – Oxford University Press
Understanding Comics by Scott McCloud
Maus by Art Spiegelman
Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi 
Fun Home by Alison Bechdel
Guy Delisle
Joe Sacco
East Asia Comics Collection – University of Pennsylvania
Mom’s Cancer by Brian Fries
The Bad Doctor by Ian Williams
Epileptic by David B.
Syllabus: Notes from an Accidental Professor by Lynda Barry
What It Is by Lynda Barry

196: Noah Lenstra

Steve chats with Noah Lenstra, author of Healthy Living at the Library, about the Let’s Move in Libraries initiative, why it’s important to work with community partners, examples of health literacy programming, and how libraries have adapted their programming due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Noah Lenstra started Let’s Move in Libraries in 2016 at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro’s School of Education, where he is an assistant professor of library and information science. His research has been published in numerous peer-reviewed publications, and in June 2020, his book Healthy Living at the Library was published by Libraries Unlimited. He earned his dissertation in 2016 from the University of Illinois Graduate School of Library and Information Science, where he also completed his MLIS. 

SHOW NOTES:

Healthy Living at the Library
Let’s Move
Let’s Move in Libraries
StoryWalk

195: Callan Bignoli and Lauren Stara

Steve chats with Callan Bignoli and Lauren Stara, authors of Responding to Rapid Change in Libraries: a User Experience Approach, about how they met and decided to write a book together, how the New York Public Library lions guided their thinking, and the myriad issues libraries need to consider to prepare for future change.

CALLAN BIGNOLI is the director of the library at Olin College of Engineering in Needham, Massachusetts. She gathers inspiration from everywhere to inform user-centered practices and push the profession forward. Callan studies and speaks about user experience design, library management, and social issues in technology, challenging students and colleagues to fight for a more just and human future. She tweets at @eminencefont and can be reached at callan.bignoli@gmail.com.


LAUREN STARA is a library building specialist with the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners, helping public libraries around the Commonwealth improve their physical spaces. A registered architect and a librarian, she has worked in and/or consulted for libraries in eight US states, three Canadian provinces, and three Eastern European countries. She has taught at library schools in Canada and Bulgaria, and she speaks and presents frequently on library design, design thinking, and service design. Lauren can be reached at lauren.stara@gmail.com.

SHOW NOTES:

Responding to Rapid Change in Libraries: a User Experience Approach
Ambient Findability by Peter Morville
Don’t Make Me Think by Steve Krug
“Vocational Awe and Librarianship: the Lies We Tell Ourselves” by Fobazi Ettarh | In The Library With The Lead Pipe
Library Space: A Planning Resource for Librarians

192: Jeremy Shermak

Guest host Troy Swanson chats with journalism professor Jeremy Shermak, about the state of journalism, misinformation vs. disinformation, the collapse of local news, and the media literacy skills librarians need to understand.

Jeremy Shermak is a journalism professor and the faculty advisor to the student newspaper, Coast Report, at Orange Coast College. He earned his Ph.D. in journalism from The University of Texas at Austin and previously studied journalism at the University of Missouri and Indiana University. He is a former journalist, managing editor and media analyst. His research interests include sports journalism, weather and climate communication, political communication, and journalism routines. You can follow him on Twitter @JeremyShermak.

Troy A. Swanson is Teaching & Learning Librarian and Library Department Chair at Moraine Valley Community College. He is also the President of the Moraine Valley Faculty Association. Troy is the author or editor of several books and articles including co-editor of Not Just Where to Click: Teaching Students How to Think About Information which received the Ilene F. Rockman Publication of the Year Award from ARCL’s Instruction Section. His Ph.D. dissertation focused on the management of technology policy in higher education. He served on ACRL’s Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Task Force which issued the Framework for Information Literacy.  Over his tenure as a librarian and educator, Troy has won his campuses Master Teacher and Innovation of the Year awards, as well as the Proquest Innovation in College Librarianship award from ACRL. 

187: Troy Swanson

Steve chats with Troy Swanson, professor at Moraine Valley Community College, about his path to librarianship, how neuroscience, psychology, and evolutionary biology can affect information literacy, and the chapter he co-wrote in Libraries Promoting Reflective Dialogue in a Time of Political Polarization.

Troy A. Swanson is Teaching & Learning Librarian and Library Department Chair at Moraine Valley Community College. He is also the President of the Moraine Valley Faculty Association. Troy is the author or editor of several books and articles including co-editor of Not Just Where to Click: Teaching Students How to Think About Information which received the Ilene F. Rockman Publication of the Year Award from ARCL’s Instruction Section. His Ph.D. dissertation focused on the management of technology policy in higher education. He served on ACRL’s Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Task Force which issued the Framework for Information Literacy.  Over his tenure as a librarian and educator, Troy has won his campuses Master Teacher and Innovation of the Year awards, as well as the Proquest Innovation in College Librarianship award from ACRL. 

SHOW NOTES:

Troy’s previous appearances on Circulating Ideas
Not Just Where to Click
Libraries Promoting Reflective Dialogue in a Time of Political Polarization

186: Stephen Krueger

Steve chats with Stephen Krueger, author of Supporting Trans People in Libraries, about his path to librarianship, why he felt the book was needed, how you can support trans staff and patrons, and his personal reactions to this year’s Library of the Year award winner.

Stephen G. Krueger (he/him or they/them) is the author of the book Supporting Trans People in Libraries and the founding member of the Gender Variant LIS Network. He has been working in various types of libraries on and off since high school, when he started at an all-volunteer public library in rural Vermont. He has since earned a BA in English from Warren Wilson College and an MSLS from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and he is now the Scholarly Publishing Librarian at Dartmouth College. Outside of work, Stephen is an avid knitter and baker; he also enjoys watching figure skating and reading about polar history. Learn more about his work at www.stephengkrueger.com, or follow him on Twitter (@StephenGKrueger).

SHOW NOTES:

Supporting Trans People in Libraries
Trans Language Primer
Trans Inclusion in Libraries (Zotero group)
The Gender Variant LIS Network (GVLIS)
“On the 2020 Library of the Year Award” (Stephen’s blog)

173: Melissa Wong

Steve chats with Melissa Wong, adjunct instructor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Graduate School of Library and Information Science and author of Instructional Design for LIS Professionals: a Guide for Teaching Librarians and Information Science Professionals, about her path to librarianship and teaching, focusing on accessibility when designing courses, supporting students, and what engages Melissa in her work.

Read the transcript.

Melissa Wong is an instructor in the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she teaches courses in instruction, e-learning, and higher education. During her career, she has served as a librarian at the University of Southern California and as the library director at Marymount California University (then Marymount College). Melissa has extensive experience developing and teaching online. She has taught for San Jose State University, designed asynchronous professional development courses for ACRL, and developed an e-learning program for the pediatrics department at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. Melissa is passionate about creating online learning that is relevant and engaging through the use of authentic content and inclusive, accessible design. She is the author of Instructional Design for LIS Professionals: A Guide for Teaching Librarians and Information Science Professionals (Libraries Unlimited, 2019) and co-editor of the upcoming 6th edition of Reference and Information Services: An Introduction (Libraries Unlimited, 2020). Melissa holds degrees from Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois (BA, English) and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (MS, library science).

SHOW NOTES:

Instructional Design for LIS Professionals: A Guide for Teaching Librarians and Information Science Professionals (Libraries Unlimited)
Melissa on Twitter: @lisafterclass

172: Amanda Clay Powers, Martin Garnar, Dustin Fife

Guest host Sarah Clark chats with Amanda Clay Powers, Martin Garnar, and Dustin Fife, authors of A Starter’s Guide for Academic Library Leaders: Advice in Conversation, about learning through conversation, fundraising, and how white leaders can initiate diverse, equitable, and inclusive change at their place of work.

Amanda Clay Powers is dean of library services at Mississippi University for Women, email: acpowers@muw.edu, twitter: @AmandaClay

Martin Garnar is dean of Kraemer Family Library at the University of Colorado-Colorado Springs, email: mgarnar@uccs.edu, twitter: @MartinGarnar

Dustin Fife is director of library services at Western State Colorado University, email: dfife@western.edu, twitter: @DustinTheFife

Sarah Clark is Dean and University Librarian at La Salle University in Philadelphia, PA. in her spare time she knits, cooks, and is currently attempting to learn pottery. Sarah writes about issues in educational and library leadership at the Kind Leadership Guild.  

SHOW NOTES:

A Starter’s Guide for Academic Library Leaders: Advice in Conversation [ALA Store]